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A Safe, Nurturing Place for Girls

The Washington School for Girls – By Kelley Lockard

Kelley Lockard and WSG Students (Class of 2016)

Before 1997, there were few quality educational options or services for girls in Southeast DC. And there was no place where a girl on the verge of womanhood could find mentorship or learn in a safe environment that values her as an individual. That is why the Washington School for Girls (WSG) was founded: to provide a safe, nurturing place for girls to not only learn and grow, but to thrive.

Of course, a lot has changed since the school was founded 20 years ago. More people have started to take an interest in Southeast neighborhoods. There are more resources, more options for education. The community itself is changing. However, through all of these changes there continues to be a strong need for a school that works for and with the community. That’s why WSG is so important, and why our students succeed: we educate the whole child.

WSG 2016-180

We pride ourselves on providing a holistic model of education, one that accepts not just students, but also families. A student’s experiences at home are just as important as her experience in the classroom. We work with parents to engage them in the educational process and help them access the resources they need to support their daughters as learners.

As an administrator and former teacher, I feel I am most attuned to a student’s needs when I have developed a close relationship with her family. I know that if I can build a long-term, reciprocal relationship with a family then I can truly help a child reach her full potential. One of the most rewarding parts of my job is seeing a girl come into her own after entering the school with nearly every aspect of her life in disarray. That kind of transformation does not happen overnight, and it’s impossible without the support of the family.

WSG 2016-131

Luckily for me, I’ve witnessed that transformation innumerable times in my years at WSG. It’s what motivates me to do the work that I do. My desk is full of photos of the young women I have helped to transform, and every day I am fortified by their smiles and the knowledge of their achievement. I look at them and know that they will make a positive difference in their communities.

WSG was built on the beliefs and values of extraordinary, courageous women. As we enter Women’s History Month and approach the 20th Anniversary of the school this spring, I am increasingly reflecting on that fact. In the classroom, our students are learning about women who have changed the course of history, but they are also learning leadership skills, whether it’s helping their teachers hand out assignments, leading an after-school club, or mentoring younger students.

I recognize the ability to lead and the determination to do so in many of our students. It is something I have worked hard to incorporate into the curriculum at WSG because I believe that leadership builds confidence and allows students to become more actively engaged in the classroom. Seeing the lightbulb come on over a student’s head is the best feeling the world, and it only happens when that student knows she is capable of more.

My hope for the future is that our students take the lessons they learn at WSG, both in and out of the classroom, to heart. There are many challenges ahead for our country and the world, especially in terms of equality and justice. The most daunting task in my job as an administrator is to ensure that our students are prepared to face those challenges, to navigate a world that does not always value them. I know that they will not be able to do it alone, but I hope that we can give them the knowledge, skills, and courage to overcome adversity.

Posted on my door is a daily affirmation known as the Serenity Prayer. It’s a very popular prayer and my mother’s favorite prayer, but I never appreciated it until I became a teacher. I look at it every day, sometimes several times (depending on the day), because it reminds me to be myself and accept the things I cannot change. Superwoman is not at all a part of my name, but I find strength in accepting that fact and courage to try anyway. If my students walk away from WSG accepting of who they are and still ready to change the world, then I know I will have succeeded.

Celebrate Black History Month with Dance Institute of Washington

Picture #1-webFebruary is Black History Month, a joyous time of celebration and reflection. We applaud the many contributions of men and women of African ancestry, many of whom accomplished feats of greatness despite considerable challenges.

We are indebted to black creative minds throughout history, those who carry the life blood and soul of the African diaspora. In artists from Duke Ellington to Aretha Franklin, from Michael Jackson to Chance the Rapper we appreciate the innovations of song and dance–the beats, the rhymes, the rhythms. Poetry, philosophy, style and culture have all been shaped and enriched by black creators.

The black community has given the world African dance and drumming, jazz, blues, soul, rock, hip hop and countless other modes of powerful expression that survive, evolve, and change the world around us. People of African descent have contributed and continue to pioneer the way in diverse fields including politics, medicine, economics, technology and science, business, sports and more.

For this blog post, Dance Institute of Washington interviewed its students, parents and teaching artists about how Black History Month inspires them.

“Black history lives in dance, because popular dance has a lot of infusion from Afro-Caribbean dance styles. Back in time, dance was a form of communication and recreation,” says Crystal Waters, a DIW parent.

“Black history is dance! Every form of dance comes from black roots,” shares Maria Fenton, another parent.

“All of our lives are connected through dance. It’s a means of communication,” DIW teacher Yasmeen Enahora explains.

Dance Institute of Washington provides youth, especially at-risk, under-served youth from low-income communities, opportunities to develop artistically, socially, emotionally and intellectually through after school dance training, performances, education, work readiness and experience, and youth development.

The late Fabian Barnes established DIW in 1987 after a career with Dance Theatre of Harlem. Celebrating 30 years of service this year, DIW is one of DC’s largest African American arts organizations.? It is a cultural, educational resource, with its own Columbia Heights studios.

DIW meets the needs of DC children through year-round dance training, education, youth workforce development, and performances. DIW affords underserved populations pathways out of poverty. Graduates go on to colleges, including Harvard, Temple and SUNY Purchase; others enter careers with companies such as Ballet San Jose, Suzanne Farrell Ballet, The Lion King and Dance Theater of Harlem.

Black history and, more specifically, the progressive, successful trajectory of black artists leading the way in contemporary ballet and professional concert dance are true inspirations. From pioneer Arthur Mitchell to Dance Institute of Washington founder Fabian Barnes to today’s beloved Misty Copeland, black artists continually rise above barriers and perceived limitations to excel at the highest levels of dance, establishing the strong appeal of the beauty, versatility and virtuosity of black artists and the black experience. To have a thriving dance world, we must continue to diversify both the talent and audience for dance, and the positive examples of successful black dancers help make this possible.

Picture #2

Black History Month is incredibly important to the work of the Dance Institute of Washington. Black history is vital because the success stories and foundation work established by other African people help to empower and inspire today’s citizens. When young people of color and of all backgrounds learn their history, they feel increased membership and belonging, they discover precedents for their own endeavors. The learning and creativity that come from looking back to our ancestors provide a path forward to new horizons.

Hope for the future

“DIW gives me hope for the future! Seeing so many young people involved in the arts.”–Crystal Waters, DIW parent

“DIW gives me hope for the future because the teachers mentor me and allow me to be exposed to new opportunities, and I admire them for that.”--Lauren Mueller, DIW student

“DIW gives me hope for the future because the teachers give us the experience that they have as professionals, and allow us to see how far we can go, as dancers.”–Terrion Jenkins, DIW student

“DIW gives me hope for humanity. Today, in the world we live in, DIW shows that through dance the continuation of humanity is possible.”–Faith Wilson, DIW student

“I love that black and white people, people of different races, are focusing on dance together. DIW is a place that offers a diverse dance experience for all races, and that’s what is hopeful about it.”–Robyn Lee Murphy, DIW parent

Picture #3Kahina Haynes, DIW’s new Executive Director is working diligently with the board, staff and community to strengthen DIW’s operations, programs and partnerships to secure DIW’s position as a beacon of hope and launchpad of talent for years to come.

Whether you have a lot of time to give or just a little, DIW welcomes the generous contributions of all volunteers and interns who can support the organization’s mission and core programs. Help is always needed in the areas of marketing, board development, management assistance, fundraising, operations, program delivery, evaluation and customer service. To explore possibilities, please email Mari Williams.

Guest Post: LearnServe International

On the eve of the 5th Annual LearnServe Venture Fair, we welcome Scott Rechler, CEO and Director of LearnServe International to GoodWorks! LearnServe International’s program prepares students in greater DC to be the next generation of global leaders and social entrepreneurs. Their Fellows Program brings together over 70 high school students from 30 public, private and charter schools to learn how to bring sustainable social change to their communities. Over an academic year, students design and launch their own social ventures — action projects to benefit their schools and communities — while learning core business entrepreneurship skills, including budgeting, strategic planning, and team-building.

Can you really teach social innovation?

by Scott Rechler, CEO & Director, LearnServe International

 

Could the next Jamila Larson, Mazi Mutafa, or Robert Egger be sitting in class right now in the District, Maryland, or Virginia?

Maybe.

In a March Washington Post article, J. D. Harrison opened his article titled “Can you really teach entrepreneurship?” with a similar question, but a different cast of characters: Steve Jobs. Mark Zuckerberg.

Toss in Bill Gates, and you’ve got the three examples of entrepreneurs referenced by every high school group I speak with. And for good reason. All three have built successful companies whose products shape our daily lives, and a personal brand that complements their corporate identities.

Ask a room full of high school students for examples of social entrepreneurs? Uncomfortable silence.

We are surrounded by powerful examples of social entrepreneurs here in the DC region. But they’re not (yet) household names — unless you happen to spend time with their organizations.

Take for example Jamila Larson, founder of the Homeless Children’s Playtime Project, which brings much-needed recreation to kids living in shelters. Or Mazi Mutafa, founder of Words Beats & Life, giving young people a voice through hip-hop. Or Robert Egger, founder of DC Central Kitchen — and of C Forward, an initiative to raise the profile of the non-profit sector nation-wide.

The next Steve Jobs or Mark Zuckerberg may well be sitting in a DC classroom today, preparing to launch the next breakthrough technology or scalable business. And sitting right next to her is the next Jamila, Mazi, and Robert.

LearnServe is committed to inspiring and training the rising generation of social entrepreneurs. These are the young people who know they want to do something good in the world — but may not yet know what or how. We help them blend this passion with the tenacity, vision, and technical skills essential to entrepreneurship in order to transform the lives of their classmates, neighbors, and communities.

Tricia Granata, executive director of the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship in DC, reflected in Harrison’s article on the “innate entrepreneurial spirit” of young people, and the importance of helping them develop the accompanying technical skills.

LearnServe offers an outlet for our students to channel this innate entrepreneurial spirit and build those technical skills — coupled with a powerful dose of empathy and social insight.

LearnServe alumni have gone on to launch companies introducing fair trade coffee to China, and improving hygiene in India through the sale of sustainable soaps in the U.S. They have created lasting organizations teaching foreign languages to elementary school students, and science to middle schoolers. Yasmine Arrington, a LearnServe and DCPS alum and founder of ScholarCHIPS, was awarded the Washington Women of Excellence Award for Community Service earlier this month for her work raising college scholarship funds for children of incarcerated parents.

Tomorrow, 70 more young social entrepreneurs will “pitch” their social venture plans to a panel of business and community leaders at LearnServe’s 5th Annual Venture Fair and top projects will receive seed funding to help get their ideas off the ground. We invite you to join in celebrating their creative spirit and vision for our community. These are our region’s rising generation of social innovators.

Harrison concludes his article with a quote from Wendy E. F. Torrance, director of entrepreneurship at the Kauffman Foundation: “No matter what career they choose, it’s important for young people to look at the world through the lens of an entrepreneur.”

We couldn’t agree more — and we are working to ensure that lens is wide enough and community-oriented enough to include Jamila, Mazi, Robert and Yasmine, alongside Steve Jobs and Mark Zuckerberg.

To learn more about LearnServe International and their Fellows Program, visit them online at: www.learn-serve.org. Meet the Fellows at the 5th Annual Venture Fair tomorrow (4/24) or get involved here!

Guest Post: LearnServe International

Today’s post comes from LearnServe International, whose programs spark high school students’ passion to make a difference and equips them with the knowledge, tools, and relationships to effectively drive local solutions to pressing global challenges. Bringing together students from across the DC area, LearnServe prepares them with the skills of business leadership, innovative problem-solving, and cross-cultural fluency. Then students are challenged to lead community-based change in their schools, across the DC region, and around the world.Empowering high-schoolers who have the motivation to make a difference, the Fellows Program guides them through the creation of their own “social venture.”

LearnServe Fellows Prepare to Speak Out

by Scott Rechler, Director & CEO, LearnServe International

When is the last time you saw someone teased, harassed, or picked on simply because of who they are? Did you recognize it as bullying? Stand up to the perpetrator? Console the person these attacks were directed towards?

Madison and Alichea, both students at Parkdale High School in Prince George’s County, ask these questions every day. Both Madison and Alichea have seen bullying first-hand. And both are ready to do something about it.

In September we challenged Madison, Alichea, and the other 70 members of the 2014 class of LearnServe Fellows to articulate the injustices they witness or experience, that they would like to put an end to. As LearnServe Fellows, Madison and Alichea and their peers will spend the year developing business plans around their respective causes, then mobilize teams to get these “social ventures” off the ground.

Madison herself has been bullied. She knows the sting of teasing and intimidation, which she has endured for more than a year. She appreciates all that her school — through counseling and peer mediation — has done to address the problem. But she feels that students can also do more to support their classmates who have been targets of bullying.

Madison plans to create a peer-to-peer support network for targets of bullying and their allies. With additional guidance from the school’s counselor, students would support each other in working through some of the emotional effects of bullying.

Alichea, a member of Parkdale’s JROTC squad, sees it as her responsibility to intervene when she sees other classmates being bullied. She wonders why more students don’t step in. Do they see it all as a harmless joke? None of their business? They’re too afraid to respond? Or they simply don’t know what bullying looks like – and feels like – in all the forms it can take?

Alichea would like to help would-be bullies and would-be bystanders better understand what bullying is and why it must stop. Through school outreach she hopes to shed light on bullying at her school and build a network of allies ready to step in and stop it as it happens.

Each year, the LearnServe Fellows Program offers leadership and social entrepreneurship training to 70 high school students like Madison and Alichea – students who represent more than 30 public, private, and charter schools in DC, Maryland, and Virginia. LearnServe guides these students as they translate the causes they are most passionate about into community impact.

LearnServe invites you to meet Madison, Alichea, and the other members of the 2014 class of LearnServe Fellows as they debut their social venture ideas at the 7th Annual Innovators Coffee House, tomorrow, December 12, 2013. The LearnServe Fellows will offer a series of 30-second “elevator pitches” on the causes they have chosen to address and the solutions they plan to design and implement this spring.

For more information about the LearnServe Fellows Program visit www.learn-serve.org/fellows.

For details or to RSVP for the 7th Annual Innovators Coffee House, visit http://learn-serve.org/learnserve-fellows-events/.

Guest Post: One World Education

Today we welcome Eric Goldstein, Founder & Executive Director of One World Education (OWEd) to GoodWorks. OWEd provides middle and high school common core literacy programs and publishes student essays about cultural and global issues, promoting peer-to-peer learning and building skills for college and career writing. Founded in 2007, the teacher-created nonprofit has been recognized throughout the Capital Region as an outstanding literacy program that improves and celebrates student writing. Nationally, OWEd has been featured on Edutopia, ASCD’s Education Blog, Huffington Post, Comcast Newsmakers, and CBS News. In 2013, OWEd was selected as the first writing program to be adopted for all DC Public High Schools.Prior to One World Education, Eric was a middle and high school teacher in a DC Charter School. We’re delighted to welcome Eric & the OWEd team as a new 2013/14 Catalogue partner!

Step Back & Move Forward

by Eric Goldstein, Founder & Executive Director, One World Education

Sometimes the most effective step an organization can take toward improving its programming is to improve the organization behind its programming. Seven years ago in an 8th grade Charter School classroom, where One World Education (OWEd) was created with my 8th grade students, thinking about anything other than involving more students in our successful writing project wasn’t even a speck on the radar.

The success of that classroom project propelled OWEd’s expansion into a citywide organization. Now the organization provides in DC middle and high schools. As students strengthen the skills needed for college and career-level writing, they learn to write and frame arguments about cultural and global issues that they care about. The organization then on its website with aligned curriculum, so students can read and learn about these topics from the perspective of their peers.

Just as our programs ensure that teachers have strong plans for their students, OWEd followed suit and used the last school year to preparing its own strategic goals. The results have spearheaded program improvements, expansion, and more efficient partner collaboration. As a new member organization in the Catalogue of Philanthropy Community, I’ll use this blog post to share some of One World Education’s goals for long-term success and sustainability.

First, schools had asked OWEd about offering more in-school, professional development (PD). We realized that a higher quality of writing was coming from students whose teachers had participated in our trainings. In response, OWEd developed a Teacher Trainer Academy where our educator team trains a teacher from each partner school. These teachers then lead OWEd’s PD in their own schools – creating leadership opportunities, fostering collaboration, and ensuring program expertise exists in each partner school.

Second, OWEd needed to change its partnership model to be more effective. This year the organization transitioned from working with individual schools to working with school districts and Charter school networks. For the 2013-2014 school year, OWEd partnered with DC Public Schools (DCPS) to implement a citywide, high school writing program. Every 9th and 10th grade DCPS student and teacher has the opportunity to participate in the One World Writing Program this year.

OWEd’s third goal was to deepen its commitment to evaluation. With the DCPS partnership in place, OWEd needed a strong evaluation partner to assess our work with 3,500 DCPS high school students and their teachers. This summer, OWEd contracted the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at George Washington University to lead this citywide evaluation.

The importance of having a strong, long-term plan is often overlooked in the face of short-term gains. As OWEd programs have demonstrated the ability to create successful teaching and learning experiences in classrooms, the organization was also successful in accomplishing its own goals over the past year. I want to thank those of you who have been a part of this accomplishment.

Thank you for your commitment to education and philanthropy.

To learn more about One World Education, please visit, www.oneworldeducation.org and keep up with Eric’s monthly blog here.

Around Town 11/1-11/7

Happy November! Catalogue nonprofits are kicking off the month right with lots of great events all around the area. Let us know if you are heading to one (and you never know, you might even see us there!). Don’t have time to get out to an event? Request a copy of our brand new catalogue (out on November 1st!) and get to know our new class of nonprofits!
Continue reading

Around Town 10/25-10/31

We are in the final stretch of October (can you believe it?)! See what these great nonprofits are doing to help October go out with a bang! Continue reading

Around Town: 10/18-10/24

With Fall in full swing, our nonprofits are getting busy! See what great events you can head to in the upcoming week. Are you a current Catalogue nonprofit with an event to promote? Make sure to put it in your portal so you can see your event in an upcoming Around Town! Continue reading

Around Town: September 20-26

The weather may be cooling down, but our nonprofits are just heating up! Check out these great events put on by some of our wonderful Catalogue nonprofits. Heading out to one of these events? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter, or by email at info@cfp-dc.org!

Saturday, September 21, 2013

VolunTrivia 3.0

Volunteer Fairfax
Join Volunteer Fairfax and compete for hundreds of dollars worth of prizes at VolunTrivia: live, MC-hosted team trivia! Teams of up to 6 players will compete for a chance to win the $200 1st place prize as well as over $300 in other prizes. Join us on Saturday, September 21st at Bennigan’s in McLean to test your knowledge, enjoy special happy hour specials, and support volunteering. To compete, you must pre-register. All registrants will have the option to play on your selected team (of up to 6 people), play solo, or ask to be placed on a pick-up team.
When: Saturday, September 21, 2013 (1:00 PM – 4:00 PM)
Where: Bennigan’s, 8201 Greensboro Drive, McLean, VA 22102
Fee?: yes $25 team; $10 individuals
Contact: Emily Davis, (703) 246-3892
For more information: click here

Monday, September 23, 2013

You’re Invited to Coffee Talk with Jubilee Jobs

Jubilee Jobs
Last year, Jubilee Jobs helped 1,000 people obtain employment. Want to know how we do it? Want to help us place 1,000 more people in jobs this year? Then join us on September 23rd at The Festival Center, 1640 Columbia Rd NW at 8:30 am. We need your help to assist the unemployed in the community. Come and hear applicant testimonials, meet our Executive Director Terry Flood, learn more about our volunteer opportunities, and join others who want to make a real difference and help others in the community. Please call ahead of time at (202) 667-8970 so we know to look for you.
When: Monday, September 23, 2013 (08:30 AM)
Where: The Festival Center, 1640 Columbia Road, NW, Washington, DC 20009
Fee?: no
Contact: Sheila Robinson, (202) 667-8970

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

WILL Power Party

Wilderness Leadership & Learning
A special cocktail reception to highlight the positive impact WILL makes in the lives of the DC youth from underserved neighborhoods and to honor the WILL Partner of the Year – Rachel Skerritt, Principal of Eastern High School
When: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 (6:00 PM – 9:00 PM)
Where: Pepco Edison Place Gallery, 702 8th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001
Fee?: yes $75 per person
Contact: Steve Abraham, (202) 319-2
For more information: click here

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Leave a Legacy Dinner and Roast for ANS Volunteers, Staff, and Former Staff

Audubon Naturalist Society
Long-time ANS support and current Executive Director, Neal Fitzpatrick, plans to retire in September after 33 years of service. Since Neal has been such a passionate advocate for protecting our local water resources and natural spaces, it seems fitting that his legacy include a fund established in his name that would support the mobilization of people of all ages to protect and restore streams in the greater DC region. To honor Neal and to build his Legacy Fund, we have planned a number of festive events! Join us for a farewell dinner to Neal on Thursday, September 26th, at 5:30pm at Woodend Sanctuary. All ANS Volunteers and current and former staff members are invited. Dinner and drinks will be served. There is a suggested donation of $15 per person (all of which is a tax-deductible gift). RSVP by Friday, September 20th, to Pam Oves at poves@audubonnaturalist.org or 301-652-9188 x16. We hope to see you there!
When: Thursday, September 26, 2013 (5:30 PM)
Where: Woodend Sanctuary, 8940 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Fee?: yes $15 suggested donation (fully tax-deductible)
Contact: Pam Oves, (301) 652-9188 ext 16
For more information: click here

Around Town: August 23-30

The school year is almost upon us, but Catalogue nonprofits are still in full summer swing! Check out what these great nonprofits have going on in your neck of the woods! Don’t forget–if you head to an event, let us know on Facebook, Twitter, or by email at info@cfp-dc.org!

Friday, August 23, 2013

Adult Literacy Tutor Orientation

Literacy Council of Montgomery County
The Literacy Council of Montgomery County will hold an information session for volunteers interested in helping adults learn to read, write or speak English. Tutors work one-on-one or with small groups. No foreign language skills are necessary. Tutors meet with students in libraries or community centers at mutually convenient times. Registration is required. Call 301-610-0030 or e-mail info@literacycouncilmcmd.org.
When: Friday, August 23, 2013 (10:30 AM – 12:00 NOON)
Where: Rockville Library, 21 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD 20850
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: Information session for potential volunteers.
Contact: Maggie Bruno, (301) 610-0030 ext 208
For more information: click here

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Nash Run Trash Trap Cleanup

Anacostia Watershed Society
The Anacostia Watershed Society has been experimenting with a stationary device built to strain the trash from the flowing waters of Nash Run, located adjacent the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Northeast DC. This is an excellent opportunity to learn about the trash challenges of the Anacostia and what is being done to address it. We need your help to keep the trash trap clean and functioning well! Contact Maddie at 301-699-6204 ext. 109 or mkoenig@anacostiaws.org to sign up!
When: Saturday, August 24, 2013 (09:00 AM – 12:00 NOON)
Where: Intersection of Anacostia Ave. NE and Douglas Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20019
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: See above.
Contact: Madeline Koenig, (301) 699-6204 ext 109

Monday, August 26, 2013

Wetland Workday

Anacostia Watershed Society
The Anacostia Watershed Society is working to restore a wetland along the Anacostia River called Kingman Marsh. Wetlands do great things for our river — they provide habitat for native wildlife, help filter toxins from river water, and act like a sponge to prevent flooding. We need your help to ensure to restore Kingman Marsh! No previous training or skills are required. All tools and supplies needed (including boots and waders) will be provided. Please note that the work will be muddy and volunteers will be asked to wear waders for the entire event. Bending, lifting, digging, and walking fair distances will be required. If this will be an issue, please consider joining us for another event. Contact Maddie Koenig at 301-699-6204 ext. 109 or mkoenig@anacostiaws.org to sign up!
When: Monday, August 26, 2013 (10:00 AM – 1:00 PM)
Where: Driving Range of Langston Golf Course, Benning Rd. NE, Washington, DC 20002
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: See above.
Contact: Madeline Koenig, (301) 699-6204 ext 109
For more information: click here

Adult Literacy Tutor Orientation

Literacy Council of Montgomery County
The Literacy Council of Montgomery County will hold an information session for volunteers interested in helping adults learn to read, write or speak English. Tutors work one-on-one or with small groups. No foreign language skills are necessary. Tutors meet with students in libraries or community centers at mutually convenient times. Registration is required. Call 301-610-0030 or e-mail info@literacycouncilmcmd.org.
When: Monday, August 26, 2013 (7:30 PM – 9:00 PM)
Where: Rockville Library, 21 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD 20850
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: Information session for potential volunteers.
Contact: Maggie Bruno, (301) 610-0030 ext 208
For more information: click here

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Wetland Workday

Anacostia Watershed Society
The Anacostia Watershed Society is working to restore a wetland along the Anacostia River called Kingman Marsh. Wetlands do great things for our river — they provide habitat for native wildlife, help filter toxins from river water, and act like a sponge to prevent flooding. We need your help to ensure to restore Kingman Marsh! No previous training or skills are required. All tools and supplies needed (including boots and waders) will be provided. Please note that the work will be muddy and volunteers will be asked to wear waders for the entire event. Bending, lifting, digging, and walking fair distances will be required. If this will be an issue, please consider joining us for another event. Contact Maddie Koenig at 301-699-6204 ext. 109 or mkoenig@anacostiaws.org to sign up!
When: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 (10:00 AM – 1:00 PM)
Where: Driving Range of Langston Golf Course, Benning Rd. NE, Washington, DC 20002
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: See above.
Contact: Madeline Koenig, (301) 699-6204 ext 109
For more information: click here

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Wetland Workday

Anacostia Watershed Society
The Anacostia Watershed Society is working to restore a wetland along the Anacostia River called Kingman Marsh. Wetlands do great things for our river — they provide habitat for native wildlife, help filter toxins from river water, and act like a sponge to prevent flooding. We need your help to ensure to restore Kingman Marsh! No previous training or skills are required. All tools and supplies needed (including boots and waders) will be provided. Please note that the work will be muddy and volunteers will be asked to wear waders for the entire event. Bending, lifting, digging, and walking fair distances will be required. If this will be an issue, please consider joining us for another event. Contact Maddie Koenig at 301-699-6204 ext. 109 or mkoenig@anacostiaws.org to sign up!
When: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 (09:00 AM – 12:00 NOON)
Where: Driving Range of Langston Golf Course, Benning Rd. NE, Washington, DC 20002
Fee? no
Volunteer Info: See above.
Contact: Madeline Koenig, (301) 699-6204 ext 109
For more information: click here

Look at Literacy

Literacy Council of Montgomery County
Come learn about the state of adult literacy in Montgomery County, how the Literacy Council addresses the needs of adults with low literacy skills, and how you can be involved.
When: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 (10:30 AM – 11:30 AM)
Where: Rockville Library, Suite 320, 21 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850
Fee? no
Contact: Marty Stephens, (301) 610-0030 ext 202
For more information: click here