Around Town 2/27-3/5

CFP charities bring you an arts-filled weekend and great events through next week. Great performances for kids, families, and adults! Take a look below and we hope you’ll be inspired to (possibly) hop up on stage and join some of the best small nonprofits in the DC region!

Friday, February 27, 2015

6th Annual CAC Gala to benefit the Center for Alexandria’s Children

The Center for Alexandria’s Children
The Center for Alexandria’s Children is hosting its 6th Annual Gala benefit, celebrating Carri Coggins Stoltz (2015 Champion for Children) and Tawana Thompson (2015 Outstanding Dedication to Children). Please join us for this fun, 70s glam-inspired evening of dinner and dancing!

When: Fri Feb 27 2015 (7:00 PM – 10:00 PM)
Where: Virtue Feed & Grain, 106 South Union Street, Alexandria, VA 22314
Fee? yes $150/per person with additional sponsorship opportunities available
Contact: Eliza Harrell, (703) 746-6043
For more information: click here

The New Adventures of the Three Musketeers

Encore Stage & Studio
In 17th-century France, a poor young nobleman named d’Artagnan leaves home to join the famous Musketeers of the Guard defenders of the King and masters of the rapier! On his journey, D’Artagnan befriends three famous Musketeers: Athos, Porthos, and Aramis. As the foursome roams the countryside, they encounter a dastardly plot to kidnap the King’s favorite dog and realize they’ll need the help of three swashbuckling ladies to save the day. This new Encore twist on the classic Alexandre Dumas adventure is recommended for children ages 6 and older.

When: Fri Feb 27 2015 (7:30 PM)
Where: Thomas Jefferson Community Theatre, 125 S. Old Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22204
Fee? yes $12 adults, $10 children, students, military and seniors
Contact: Box Office, (703) 548-1154
For more information: click here

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Art Enables @ Dumbarton Concert Gallery Opening Reception

Art Enables
Come see the Art Enables exhibit as artists work together in a beautiful studio space where they express their creativity and tell their personal stories through striking visual images. One of Art Enables’ goals is to further an understanding and acceptance of the alternative, visual way in which many people who are marginalized for any number of reasons can communicate when they are given the chance.

When: Sat Feb 28 2015 (6:00 PM – 8:00 PM)
Where: Dumbarton Church, 3133 Dumbarton Street NW, Washington, DC 20007
Fee? no
Contact: Ginny Barnes, (202) 965-2000

Soul in Motion African Dancers and Drummers

Joe’s Movement Emporium/World Arts Focus
In the spirit of Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility), Soul In Motion will celebrate African-American History as we pay a special tribute to our community. In the true spirit of collaborative work, Soul In Motion is honored to share the stage with several artistic partners, which has become and continues to be our tradition. Plan to come out and be a part of this special performance and “So Much More…”

When: Sat Feb 28 2015 (8:00 PM)
Where: Joe’s Movement Emporium, 3309 Bunker Hill Road, Mount Rainier, MD 20712
Fee? yes
Contact: Box Office, (301) 699-1819
For more information: click here

Sunday, March 01, 2015

The Kennedy Center, Young Playwrights Theater & Atlas Performing Arts Center

Young Playwrights’ Theater
Through Theatre for Young Audiences/USA, middle school students from across the US have been invited to respond to the question: What makes a family? Discover how young playwrights from our region look at how families today blend race, culture, sexual orientation and generations and come together through adoption, birth, marriage and many other ways. The goal is to produce meaningful conversations that will ripple across our nation in classrooms, theatres, and communities. Experience young voices responding to their world.

When: Sun Mar 1 2015 (2:00 PM)
Where: The Atlas Performing Arts Center, Lab 1, 1333 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Fee? yes $2 tickets
Contact: Box Office, (202) 399-7993
For more information:click here

Monday, March 02, 2015

The Raising of America Film Screening & Panel Discussion

The Child & Family Network Centers
Join us this for an unforgettable evening as we screen a trailblazing film and engage in meaningful conversation about early childhood development. The Child & Family Network Centers and ACT for Alexandria will host a screening of The Raising of America: Early Childhood and the Future of Our Nation and expert-led panel discussion. The event is free!

When: Mon Mar 2 2015 (7:00 PM – 9:00 PM)
Where: US Patent and Trademark Office, 600 Dulaney St, Alexandria, VA 22314
Fee? no
Contact: Child & Family Network Centers, (703) 836-0214
For more information: click here

Adult Literacy Tutor Information Session

Literacy Council of Montgomery County
The Literacy Council of Montgomery County will hold an information session for volunteers interested in helping adults learn to read, write, or speak English. Once volunteers have completed the information session, they can select a two-part training session that fits their schedules. No foreign language skills are necessary. Tutors work one-on-one or with small groups, and typically meet with students in libraries or community centers at mutually convenient times.

When: Mon Mar 2 2015 (7:30 PM – 9:00 PM)
Where: Rockville Memorial Library, 21 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850
Fee? no
Contact: Jennifer Redding, (301) 610-0030 ext 208
For more information: click here

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Step Afrika! Reads at the Hill Center

Step Afrika! USA
Step Afrika! Reads is designed to teach young children of all cultural and economic backgrounds to be active. It encourages parents to read to their children on a daily basis. The 35-minute program is structured for two to five year-olds and combines reading, exercise and creative movement. Tickets are free but there’s limited space so please use the link below to reserve a spot!

When: Thu Mar 5 2015 (10:00 AM – 10:45 AM)
Where:Hill Center, 921 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20003
Fee? no
Contact: Alorie Clark, (202) 399-7993 ext 112
For more information: click here

#WhatsUpWednesday 02.25.15

This week, Catalogue nonprofits from our Education and Human Services categories gave us a peek into this week’s activities. Watch the video below to see more!

DC Special Education Cooperative
DC Special Education Cooperative introduced its Spring 2015 cohort of INCLUDE DC - a special education training course for general education teachers.

DC SCORES
DC SCORES participants and alumni were Aspen Institute Sports & Society Program’s#ProjectPlay Summit as panel stars this morning, talking about the importance of sports and teamwork.

Free Minds Book Club & Writing Workshop
Free Minds had an On The Same Page event with interns from Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia (PDS), and Georgetown Law.

Our Daily Bread
Financial Literacy volunteers received lots of love today from Our Daily Bread and Community Lodgings. Lucas Wall, a volunteer,presented 3 budgeting classes to Community Lodging clients in January and early February, and both organizations are so grateful to him for giving of himself to help improve the lives of our neighbors!

7 Questions with Sister Mary Bourdon, Head of School of Washington School for Girls

“While there was a large national discussion about the school-to-prison pipeline and the challenges facing African-American boys, there was little conversation about the girls. We kept thinking to ourselves, what about the girls?”

In honor of Black History Month, we welcome Sister Mary Bourdon, Head of School at Washington School for Girls. Washington School for Girls offers a solid and holistic education in the Catholic educational tradition, featuring intellectual challenge, respect for diversity, and support for the spiritual, social and emotional growth of each student.

  1. What motivated you to begin working with your organization?

While working in the DC area in the late 1990s, it became very clear to me and a few of my colleagues that girls in Wards 7 and 8 were struggling to make it through school. While there was a large national discussion about the school-to-prison pipeline and the challenges facing African-American boys, there was little conversation about the girls. We kept thinking to ourselves, what about the girls? The girls were the ones who were increasingly ending up pregnant as teenagers, unable to complete high school while taking care of a child. The girls were becoming mothers, then grandmothers, unable to pursue their educations and careers. We wondered, could we help these girls to take charge of their education, their goals, and their lives? We thought about the many ways we could serve girls in Far Southeast DC, and determined that a school founded on the principles of the faith, courage, and perseverance was the way that we, as educators, could make a difference for the girls who needed us.

  1. What exciting change or innovation is on your mind?

The innovative change that is on my mind almost every day is the addition of our new third grade program, which will begin July 15, 2015. By expanding into 3rd grade, we will be able to reach students at a crucial point in their educations: when they transition from learning to read to reading to learn. Research shows that Black and Hispanic children who are not reading proficiently by the 3rd grade are twice as likely as similar white children to drop out of high school later on. Our experience with our existing 4th-8th grade program has shown over the years that our students are already below grade level when they join us in 4th grade. It was obvious to us that we could do more for our girls if we meet them earlier in their educational careers. Not only will this new program expand our student population by approximately twenty students, but also it will serve as a pilot program for year-round school. The 3rd grade students will join us in mid-July and participate in the program for a full year, a model that has been proven to improve academic success in populations like ours. We are eager to have more classroom time with our students in core subjects, as well as the flexibility in schedule to increase our enrichment curriculum in the arts and other areas. The full year program will enable our exceptional teachers to adapt their curriculum based on student needs, without fear of running out of time. We believe that adding the year round 3rd grade program will help us to better serve our students and their families.

  1. Who inspires you (in the philanthropy world or otherwise)? Do you have a hero?

I often find myself thinking about Claudine Thevenet, the founding mother of my religious order, the Religious of Jesus and Mary. Claudine was a teenager during the French Revolution, and watched two of her brothers be executed during the conflict. She was inspired by their last words, Forgive as we forgive, and dedicated the rest of her life to relieving the suffering of the many children who were orphaned as a result of the Revolution. She is remembered by history as a woman of courage, faith, perseverance, and an unyielding belief in the goodness of God. Her commitment was always to the most vulnerable, believing that they could find purpose through the combination of education and coming to know God. Claudine is one of three Founding Spirits who inspire everything we do at WSG. The others are Cornelia Connelly, founder of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus (another religious order that is dedicated to education) and Mary McLeod Bethune, an African-American educator and civil rights activist who founded the National Council of Negro Women. Each of these women holds a special place in my heart for what she contributed to education and progress in her era.

  1. What was your most interesting recent project/partnership?

WSG thrives thanks to many partnerships with area organizations, including our Catalogue for Philanthropy peers: Higher Achievement, THEARC, the Fort Dupont Ice Arena, Joy of Motion, and many more. All of our partnerships help us provide rich and engaging experiences for our students throughout the year. In recent years, WSG has been fortunate to partner with the Christ Child Society to provide counseling services to our students. This ongoing partnership places a counselor on each campus (The VIEW Campus for grades 3-4 and THEARC Campus for grades 6, 7, 8) for individual and group sessions as well and consultations for teachers, administration, and families. A counselor is at The VIEW Campus for three days each week and a counselor is at THEARC Campus for four days per week. This is a tremendous resource for our girls, who benefit greatly from the consistent availability of counseling services. We are also particularly excited to be partnering with the National Park Trust and the Buddy Bison Program. This connection has enriched our Science program over the past two and a half years, as the outstanding guides have led our students on multiple field trips in many of the national parks in our region. These trips coincide with our Science curriculum, and also provide an opportunity for students to explore and enjoy the outdoors.

  1. What is the single greatest challenge that your organization faces (besides finances) and how are you dealing with this challenge?

The greatest challenges that our organization faces are the challenges that our students and their families face in their community: socio-economic strain, violence, crime, and social or familial conflict. What happens outside of school has a great impact on what our girls can achieve in school. While we can’t prevent every negative influence in the community, we can make WSG the safest place for students. With that goal in mind, we begin every morning with community prayer and maintain an atmosphere of calm and positivity throughout the day. Students have many avenues of support, from their teachers, advisors, administrative staff, and the on-site counselor, all of whom help students work through the problems they face both in school and in their personal lives. Finally, we strive to engage families at every possible opportunity. A student’s parent or guardian is the primary educator, and we seek to collaborate with and support them to the best of our ability. Often this can come in the form of connecting them to resources in the community that they may have been unaware of, or sometimes it may mean providing meals and emergency support following a tragedy. Ultimately, we hope that our families know that they can come to us and that we will do all we can to help them.

  1. What advice do you have for other people in your position?

My strategy for leadership has always been a blend of discernment and collaboration. My advice to other directors would be to create a blueprint for action informed by two things: your own instinct, and the informed insights of experts in your field. The principles of good management and leadership are so-called because they work, so seek out mentors and advisors who can help you develop those skills and structures within your institution. Having a framework in place allows you more time to think about the big picture and to make the important decisions that will move your organization forward.

  1. What’s next/coming up for you?

My interests have always centered on fostering the well-being and promotion of young girls. While our students remain in the forefront of my mind, I am also increasingly concerned about the international issue of child trafficking. What young children go through in some parts of the world, even in our own back yard, is absolutely devastating. I am interested in learning more about this issue and considering how I might be able to make a difference for these young people.

Around Town 2/20-2/26

From dance and theater performances, to community walk-through’s, and gala events to support worthy causes in our region, this week CFP nonprofits offer a host of activities for young, old, and the creative (clay workshops!) No better way to beat the cold than getting out and enjoying DC culture and volunteer opportunities!

Friday, February 20, 2015

Step Afrika! Reads at the Hill Center

Step Afrika! USA
Step Afrika! Reads is designed to teach young children of all cultural and economic backgrounds to be active. It encourages parents to read to their children on a daily basis. The 35-minute program is structured for two to five year-olds and combines reading, exercise and creative movement. Tickets are free but there’s limited space so please use the link below to reserve a spot!

When: Fri Feb 20 2015 (11:00 AM – 11:45 AM)
Where: Hill Center, 921 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20003
Fee? no
Contact: Alorie Clark, (202) 399-7993 ext 112
For more information: click here

Painting Clay and Sipping Cabernet

Capitol Hill Arts Workshop
At this monthly workshop, we will use underglaze and the frisket technique to create paintings on clay tiles. Come join teaching artist Clay Hollenkamp for a great opportunity to play just a little in the mud, and see for yourself why this versatile art form is his favorite. The costincludes materials as well as refreshments and wine.

When: Fri Feb 20 2015 (6:30 PM – 8:30 PM)
Where: Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th Street SE, Washington, DC 20003
Fee? yes $40
Contact: Main Office, (202) 547-6839

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Navigating Cultural Spaces: A Conversation with the Code Switch Team from NPR

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company
What are the different cultural spaces we inhabit, and how do we navigate between them? What are the masks we wear, and are they the sum total of who we are? What does it mean to search for an authentic self, given that our identities are complex and constantly shifting? Join us for a special conversation with Code Switch a team of NPR journalists at the forefront of the dialogue on race, ethnicity and culture to unpack questions of identity and authenticity in Cherokee, and discuss how these issues play out in our own lives and communities. **This event follows the 3pm performance of Cherokee**

When: Sat Feb 21 2015 (5:00 PM)
Where: Woolly Theatre, 641 D St NW, Washington, DC 20004
Fee? no
Contact: Woolly Mammoth, (202) 393-3939
For more information: click here

Faculty and Workstudy Dance Project

Joy of Motion Dance Center
Joy of Motion Dance Center is thrilled to present the annual Faculty and Workstudy Dance Project at the Jack Guidone Theater, Saturday February 21 @ 8:00 PM. Faculty and Workstudy Dance Project showcase will feature 12 performances in ballet, contemporary, modern and hip hop. Choreography will be presented by: Lauren Borchard, Tiffany Haughn, Sara Herrera, Christina Huertas, Chika Imamura, Stephanie Kawesch, Maverick Lemons, Felipe Oyarzun, Roxann Rowley, Malaika Tate Scott, Rachel Turner and Adriane Whalen

When: Sat Feb 21 2015 (8:00 PM)
Where: The Jack Guidone Theater, 5207 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20015
Fee? yes $15 for Students/Seniors, $20 for Adults
Contact: Box Office, (202) 362-3042
For more information: click here

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Community Open House @ Project Create

Project Create
Project Create Studio has finally been built! Classes start in March, but we will have a series of February events for families in Anacostia to learn more about studio programming. We’re hosting a community open house from 1-5pm for community members of all ages. Check out the space, meet the staff and do a short, fun art activity.

When: Sun Feb 22 2015 (1:00 PM – 5:00 PM)
Where: Project Create Studio (above Mama’s Pizza – entrance on V St), 2028 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC 20020
Fee? no
Contact: Project Create, (202) 889-0655
For more information: click here

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Adult Literacy Tutor Information Session

Literacy Council of Montgomery County
The Literacy Council of Montgomery County will hold an information session for volunteers interested in helping adults learn to read, write, or speak English. Once volunteers have completed the information session, they can select a two-part training session that fits their schedules. No foreign language skills are necessary. Tutors work one-on-one or with small groups, and typically meet with students in libraries or community centers at mutually convenient times.

When: Tue Feb 24 2015 (10:30 AM – 12:00 NOON)
Where: Rockville Memorial Library, 21 Maryland Ave., Rockville, MD 20850
Fee? no
Contact: Jennifer Redding, (301) 610-0030 ext 208
For more information: click here

GK-DC Annual Benefit

Global Kids
Join special guests Elizabeth Kucinich and Tara Sonenshine for the Global Kids DC Annual Benefit at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. All proceeds from the 2015 Global Kids DC Benefit will support Global Kids’ innovative work with young people, through which youth learn not only about the world around them, but also how to make an impact in their schools, in their local communities, and on the global stage.

When: Tue Feb 24 2015 (6:00 PM – 8:30 PM)
Where: German Marshall Fund, 1744 R Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
Fee? yes $75
Contact: Grace Kim, (212) 226-0130 ext 107
For more information: click here

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

One World Writing Celebration

One World Education
The Celebration honors 20-25 of the best local student writers – chosen from among thousands of participants in OWEd’s One World Writing Program. These students will have their writing published and aligned with curriculum, so it can serve as a learning tool for their peers. Two teachers will also receive OWEd’s Global Educator Award in recognition of their achievements in integrating cultural and global issues into their writing instruction.

When: Wed Feb 25 2015 (6:30 PM – 8:00 PM)
Where: GALA Theatre, 3333 14th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010
Fee? no
Contact: Eric Goldstein, (202) 558-8899
For more information: click here

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Sneaker Soiree for Girls on the Run – DC

Girls on the Run – DC
Enjoy a fun evening with a reception, unique art at the Gallery, and special guests including: Kaya Henderson, Chancellor – DC Public Schools Tiombe Hurd, American Triple Jump Record Holder. The Sneaker Soiree, our primary fundraising event, benefits Girls on the Run – DC’s efforts to bring the life-changing program to as many girls as possible, regardless of financial situation. Dress: Cocktail / business attire with sneakers (awards will be given for best dressed with sneakers). Tickets: $110 each

When: Thu Feb 26 2015 (6:00 PM – 8:30 PM)
Where: Pepco Edison Place Gallery, 702 8th St NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20068
Fee? yes $110 per ticket
Contact: Kelly Makimaa, (832) 443-8909
For more information: click here

7 Questions: Thembi Duncan, Artistic Director of African Continuum Theatre Company

TDuncan Headshot 2

Right now theaters are integrating and experimenting with technology and social media in their artistic work, as well as in their outreach efforts.”

In honor of Black History Month we welcome Thembi Duncan, Artistic Director of the African Continuum Theatre Company. The African Continuum Theatre Company presents high-quality productions, workshops, and programs that illuminate African-American experiences, examine multiple facets of identity, and explore the connections of African-Americans to the African Diaspora. A native of the Washington D.C. area, Thembi has performed as an actor, playwright, director, and teaching artist in the region for almost 15 years. Many of her most treasured and formative onstage experiences were in African Continuum productions, so she is honored to serve as the leader of this renowned artistic?organization.

  1. What motivated you to begin working with your organization?

This theater company gave me one of my first professional opportunities as a young actress, and I’ll never forget the warmth with which I was treated. I was cared for like family, and the artistic work we created was culturally meaningful.

  1. What exciting change or innovation is on your mind?

Right now theaters are integrating and experimenting with technology and social media in their artistic work, as well as in their outreach efforts. It’s exciting to watch this art form enter the 21st century with aplomb.

  1. Who inspires you (in the philanthropy world or otherwise)? Do you have a hero?

Oprah Winfrey’s philanthropy covers such a wide range of causes and demographics. She truly sees with her heart, and not her eyes. That is a great inspiration to me.

  1. What was your most interesting recent project/partnership?

I love our 1voice! 1play! 1day! partnerships with Project1Voice –We’ve presented reading of the same play, simultaneously with dozens of other theaters around the country. The most recent collaboration was a worldwide reading of Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls…who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf.

  1. What is the single greatest challenge that your organization faces (besides finances) and how are you dealing with this challenge?

Right now our biggest challenge is the question of whether or not a black theater is necessary in Washington, D.C. at this time. Yes, it is wonderful to have one, but are we essential? Can black theater artists thrive without this organization? 15 years ago, the answer was obvious. So much has changed since then, and black artists are self-producing as well as being produced in the major houses. I’ve been tossing that question around a lot lately.

  1. What advice do you have for other people in your position?

1. Other people’s opinions of you are none of your business. 2. Stick to your core values. If you find that the work you are doing doesn’t line up with your core values, one or the other is out of line.

  1. What’s next/coming up for you?

The Black Theatre Symposium is coming up on Saturday, February 28. This is our second year partnering with the School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies at the Clarice Smith Center (UMD) for this event, and it was a great success last year! We’re so looking forward to engaging in numerous conversations about many aspects of black theater.

7 Questions: James Woody, Executive Director of Bishop John T. Walker School for Boys

James Woody headshot “I’m hopeful that systemic change will take root, offering the promise of the American Dream to a subset of our society for whom that dream remains particularly elusive.”

In honor of Black History month we welcome James Woody, Executive Director of Bishop John T. Walker School for Boys. The Bishop John T. Walker School for Boys is an Episcopal School for children of low-income families that welcomes boys of all faith traditions. James talks about how the Bishop T Walker School?exists uniquely in the DC education landscape and how he’s working to provide high quality education to boys of color in South East DC.

  1. What motivated you to begin working with your organization?

Boys of color have disproportionately fallen through the cracks of the education system as evidenced by high suspension rates, limited academic proficiency and unacceptably low graduation rates. As a native Washingtonian who grew up at a time when a high quality education was available throughout all quadrants of the city, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to effect positive change for boys who are growing up in neighborhoods that remind me of my own.

  1. What exciting change or innovation is on your mind?

Young men with whom we have worked since pre-K or kindergarten will be entering middle school in the fall. I can’t help but notice that their coming of age is happening at a time when social activists are promoting the message that their lives do matter. I’m hopeful that systemic change will take root, offering the promise of the American Dream to a subset of our society for whom that dream remains particularly elusive.

  1. Who inspires you (in the philanthropy world or otherwise)? Do you have a hero?

Bishop Desmond Tutu’s unwavering commitment to peace, justice and universal human rights is a constant source of inspiration to me. His heroic and prophetic voice in the midst of some of the world’s most intractable challenges has made an indelible impression on me.

  1. What was your most interesting recent project/partnership?

I’m really excited about our on-going partnership with THEARC that is on track to have our upper primary and middle school students in a brand new building on their campus in the fall of 2017. It’s been fascinating to work with diverse disciplines like educational programming, finance, fund development and architecture in support of the project.

  1. What is the single greatest challenge that your organization faces (besides finances) and how are you dealing with this challenge?

As a private school in a community in which the educational conversation tends to revolve around public and public charter offerings, we must constantly work to differentiate ourselves while at the same time collaboratively participating in the positive efforts that are taking place in support of students whose success is tied to a unified community effort on their behalf. Working with the system, while remaining outside it requires agility, flexibility and resourcefulness.

  1. What advice do you have for other people in your position?

If you are convinced your mission is critical, pursue it relentlessly, without regard to popular opinion or trends. At the same time, never succumb to the myth that you are indispensible. Take care of your health and well-being and mindfully nurture the relationships that sustain you.

  1. What’s next/coming up for you?

Latin guitar lessons — there’s a syncopated rhythm percolating inside me that I’m dying to share with the world.

Around Town 2/13-2/19

On this blistering Friday morning our amazing CFP nonprofits both indoor and outdoor (for the brave souls) activities this weekend and next week! Romantic plays and open-mic nights for the couples, family-friendly performances for the whole crew, and invasive species removal for the adventurous. What’s not to love about these activities and the amazing nonprofits that host them!

Friday, February 13, 2015

House of Desires at GALA

GALA Hispanic Theatre Don Pedro loves Dona Leonor who loves Don Carlos, who is desired by Dona Ana. Los empenos de una casa is a romantic Spanish Golden Age comedy of intrigue that mixes lyrical poetry, puns, songs, cross-dressing, and mistaken identities. Written in the 17th century, but staged by director Hugo Medrano in 1940s Mexico with its machismo and sounds of mariachi, this farce examines the idea of free will for women at a time when they were still subject to a strict moral code. Featuring the talents of Natalia Miranda, Mauricio Pita, Carlos Castillo, Luz Nicolas, Oscar Ceville, Hector Diaz, Alina Collins Maldonado, Erick Sotomayor, Miguel Amaguana, and Roberto Colmenares.

When: Fri Feb 13 2015 (8:00 PM) Where: GALA Hispanic Theatre, 3333 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20010 Fee? yes $20 if you mention the Valentine’s Special (otherwise $42 GA; $26 Seniors; $20 Student/Military) Contact: GALA Box Office, (202) 234-7174 For more information: click here

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Petite Rouge: A Cajun Red Riding Hood

Adventure Theatre MTC Take a toe-tapping trip to the bayou in this family-friendly, Zydeco-driven musical soaked in N’awlins hot sauce! Based on the classic fairy tale and adapted from the book by Mike Artell and Jim Harris, a red-hooded duckling named Petite Rouge and her sidekick cat lead the Big Bad Gator on a wild “duck” chase through New Orleans and Mardi Gras. Will they make it to Grandmere’s house with a basket full of Cajun goodies? Recommended for all ages.

When: Sat Feb 14 2015 (11:00 AM – 12:00 NOON) Where: Adventure Theatre Glen Echo Park, 7300 MacArthur Blvd, Glen Echo, MD 20812 Fee? yes $19 (kids under 1 are free) Contact: Box Office, (301) 634-2270 For more information: click here

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Community Open House at Project Create

Project Create Project Create Studio has finally been built! Classes start in March, but we will have a series of February events for families in Anacostia to learn more about studio programming. We’re hosting a community open house from 1-5pm for community members of all ages. Check out the space, meet the staff and do a short, fun art activity.

When: Sun Feb 15 2015 (1:00 PM – 5:00 PM) Where: Project Create Studio (above Mama’s Pizza – entrance on V St), 2028 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave SE, Washington, DC 20020 Fee? no Contact: Project Create, (202) 889-0655 For more information: click here

Invasive Plant Removal and Park Clean Up

Arlingtonians for a Clean Environment ACE will be teaming up with Arlington County’s Remove Invasive Plant Program (RiP) to remove invasives from Long Branch Park, and clean up some trash while we are at it!

When: Sun Feb 15 2015 (2:00 PM – 4:00 PM) Where: Long Branch Nature Center, 625 S. Carlin Springs Rd, Arlington, VA 22204 Fee? no Contact:ACE, (703) 228-6427 For more information: click here

Sunday Kind of Love Open Mic Featuring Ailish Hopper and Bettina Judd

Split This Rock Open Mic and Poetry Reading featuring Ailish Hopper and Bettina Judd (Bios below). As always, open mic follows! Co-Sponsored by Busboys and Poets and Split This Rock About the Featured Poets:

Ailish Hopper grew up in DC, and is the author of Dark~Sky Society (2014), selected by David St. John as runner up for the New Issues prize, and the chapbook Bird in the Head (2005), selected by Jean Valentine for the Center for Book Arts Prize. Individual poems have appeared in Agni, APR, Blackbird, Harvard Review Online, Ploughshares, Poetry, Tidal Basin Review, and other places. She has received support from the Baltimore Commission for the Arts and Humanities, the MacDowell Colony, Maryland State Arts Council, and Yaddo. Her poems have appeared in Torch, Mythium, Meridians and other journals and anthologies. Most recently, her collection of poems titled Patient won the Black Lawrence Press Hudson Book Prize and was published in November of 2014. As a singer, she has been invited to perform for audiences in Vancouver, Washington DC, Atlanta, Paris, New York, and Mumbai.

When: Sun Feb 15 2015 (5:00 PM – 7:00 PM) Where: Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20009 Fee? yes $5 online or at the door Contact: Split This Rock, (202) 787-5210 For more information: click here

Monday, February 16, 2015

President’s Day Invasive Removal at Melvin Hazen East

Rock Creek Conservancy (formerly Friends of Rock Creek’s Environment) Join Rock Creek Conservancy and the National Park Service as we remove invasive plant species from the eastern section of Melvin Hazen. Tools, gloves, bags, and training will be provided at each site, and SSL hours can be earned.

When: Mon Feb 16 2015 (10:00 AM – 12:00 NOON) Where: 2601 Quebec Street NW, Washington, DC 20008 Fee? no

Volunteer Info: Volunteers will help remove invasive plants from the trees and the ground in the eastern section of Melvin Hazen Park, a section of Rock Creek Park. Please dress appropriately for the weather. It may be chilly so dress warmly and in layers. Wear sturdy boots or sneakers, no sandals. If it is raining or snowing on the morning of the event, it will be cancelled. All cancellations will be updated and announced on our event calendar listing. What to Bring: Bring water. Tools and gloves will be provided. Feel free to bring your own tools and gloves if you have them. Students can earn SSL hours, but please bring needed forms. Volunteers will meet at the end of Quebec Street NW where a social trail begins. There is limited street parking, so volunteers are encouraged to carpool or use public transportation. This site is MetroRail accessible through the Cleveland Park Metro Stop (red line) Contact: Rena Subotnik (leader), (301) 579-3105 For more information: click here

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Adult Literacy Tutor Information Session

Literacy Council of Montgomery County The Literacy Council of Montgomery County will hold an information session for volunteers interested in helping adults learn to read, write, or speak English. Once volunteers have completed the information session, they can select a two-part training session that fits their schedules. No foreign language skills are necessary. Tutors work one-on-one or with small groups, and typically meet with students in libraries or community centers at mutually convenient times.

When: Tue Feb 17 2015 (7:30 PM – 9:00 PM) Where: Wheaton Library, 11701 Georgia Ave., Wheaton, MD 20904 Fee? no Contact: Jennifer Redding, (301) 610-0030 ext 208 For more information: click here

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

The Great (Urban)Escape: Enter the Woods with The Spa Room

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company What happens when we stop trying to relax away tension and instead tune IN to our own embodied selves. Join The Spa Room for an exploration of the five senses through meditation, mindfulness, and movement led by body-mind psychotherapist Mary Szegda and Somatic Ecologist Rob Bettmann. After the workshop, join us for a complimentary glass of wine and our 8:00pm showing of Cherokee, by Lisa D’Amour. Note: Please wear comfortable clothing and bring a yoga mat (if possible) and RSVP to reserve your seat!

When: Wed Feb 18 2015 (6:15 PM) Where: Rehearsal Hall, 641 D St NW, Washington, DC 20004 Fee? no Contact: Woolly Mammoth, (202) 393-3939 For more information: click here

Writing Workshop for All Ages

Split This Rock Split This Rock and The Beltway Poetry Slam are hosting bi-monthly writing workshops on the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of every month. All ages are welcome; no need to RSVP. Just come ready to write! Split This Rock’s programs are made possible in part by grants from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Morris & Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation.

When: Wed Feb 18 2015 (6:30 PM – 8:30 PM) Where: 1112 16th St NW – 6th Floor Conference Room, Washington, DC 20036 Fee? yes $5 cash or check (payable to Split This Rock) Contact: Split This Rock, (202) 787-5210

#WhatsUpWednesday 02.11.14

What’s sweeter than chocolate this Valentine’s Day? Supporting your favorite community nonprofits by making a donation, following them on social media, attending an event, or volunteering!

Check out what some of your favorite CFP charities have been up to this week in our #whatsupwednesday video below, and visit their CFP pages to see how you can get involved.

DC SCORES
Last week, DC SCORES students from Lincoln Middle School got to visit the White House for the L.A. Galaxy and L.A. Kings’ championships ceremony!

Girls on the Run – DC
Want a Sneak Peek at the fun in store for the Girls on the Run – DC Sneaker Soiree fundraiser coming up on Thursday, February 26th? Find your GOTR-style sneakers to wear for the evening & win “best dressed with sneakers”…..There’ll be a reception, fun prizes, special guest speakers, and more. Help support girls all across DC who want to participate in the program and rely on program scholarships in order to do so. The Sneaker Soiree is Thursday, February 26th from 6 – 8:30 pm at the Pepco Edison Place Gallery. Ticket information:http://bit.ly/1zPTIod

Turning the Page
In honor of Black History Month, Turning the Page received new books. Kids and parents get to choose from these books and more at every Community Night!

Community Ministries of Rockville
One is never too old to learn new things and yesterday’s workshop on Heart Healthy Nutrition for seniors was proof of that. Organized by the Elderly Ministries Program of Community Ministries of Rockville, the workshop featured a presentation by Lindsey Seegers, the Nutrition Educator from Manna Food Center. Both CMR and Manna are CFP non-profits. Elderly guests were given some simple tips on how to improve their diets by reading labels and avoiding foods rich in sodium, sugar and saturated fats, eating fresh and frozen rather than canned foods….and how to be aware of misleading food labels. Interpreters were on hand to help Chinese speaking guests and Manna brought headsets that interpreted for Spanish attendees. No matter what language you speak, no matter how old you are, the message was plain…eat healthy for your heart.

#WhatsUpWednesday 02.04.15

The groundhog may have predicted a long winter, but with today’s sunshine, and the activities happening our nonprofits this week, we can’t help but feel like spring is just around the corner. From creating brightly colored pottery, to an “arts & craft” fundraiser, to planning the next season of vibrant outdoor markets…Catalogue nonprofits are spreading warmth across Greater Washington.

DC SCORES
During Winter SCORES, students from Johnson Middle School visited the Newseum and students from Hart Middle School learned how to mold pottery thanks to All Fired Up.

Capitol Hill Arts Workshop
This Saturday, join Capitol Hill Arts Workshop for CHAW & Brau: Arts & Craft Beer Fundraiser! In addition to the brewery’s normal tours and tastings, CHAW will provide a fresh artistic twist on Growler Hours with a CHAW Valentine’s Photo Booth, musical performances, a give-and-win raffle, and class registration sign-ups to keep the creative energy going.

FRESHFARM Markets
The staff at FRESHFARM is planning the next season of farmers markets with help from huge box of bread from new producer!

Our Daily Bread
This week, Our Daily Bread is grateful to Mary Eure of NVA’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) for meeting and helping demystify Fed & VA income taxes for Project BRIDGE clients and some of our volunteer Financial mentors!

Good Shepherd Housing and Family Services
Be sure to check out Good Shepherd’s Facebook page during the month of February – For each new “Like” a generous donor will give GSH $5! Spread the word!

DC Bilingual Public Charter School
Pre-K kids from DC Bilingual Public Charter School know how to make healthy eating fun while they bring smiles to everyone’s faces!

7 Questions with Jan May, Executive Director of Legal Counsel for the Elderly

Legal Counsel for the Elderly (LCE) celebrates its 40th anniversary this year. It established the first legal hotline in the country which serves as a model to more than 160 hotlines across the country. In 2014, LCE secured monetary benefits for its clients in the amount of $13,096,400. During the year LCE’s ongoing legal work for individuals, its public outreach and weekly community education programs, served well over 6,000 older D.C. residents. As LCE begins its 40th year, it will continue to uphold its mission to ensure at-risk seniors can age with dignity and purpose by providing free legal services to D.C. seniors in need.

  1. What motivated you to begin working with your organization?

I went to law school with the purpose of serving low income individuals. In law school, I became involved in working on a textbook on law and aging. That fostered my interest in this specific area and then joined the staff of Legal Counsel for the Elderly. In addition, as a fledgling organization in 1977, LCE offered the opportunity for my participating in the growth and maturation of a non-profit organization.

  1. What exciting change or innovation is on your mind?

In the last year and a half, we have been involved in identifying, developing and marketing systemic reform projects for large law firms to address on a pro bono basis in addition to the thousands of individual cases we handle each year. Some 50 projects have been developed and placed since. This is a very significant development that will ultimately bring substantial change for large numbers of our clients and ideally serve as a model elsewhere. These projects range from a consumer manual on nursing homes, Freedom of Information Act requests, utility litigation, review of power of attorney statutes, and materials and training on public benefits implications from the Supreme Court same sex marriage case, to name a few.

  1. Who inspires you (in the philanthropy world or otherwise)? Do you have a hero?

I think it is best to take an eclectic view of heroes because multiple people inspire us in different ways. In the legal arena, I have always been inspired by the late John Pickering, founding partner at Wilmer Hale (nee Wilmer, Cutler and Pickering). John’s insight, humility, intelligence, focused thinking and ability to accomplish great things making it seem like just ordinary stuff was really amazing. I have also been involved in management issues through a national legal aid organization focusing on management issues and in so doing have learned to admire and seek out leaders in legal services in discrete areas such as fund-raising, personnel, pro bono and delivery systems in general for guidance, direction and inspiration.

  1. What was your most interesting recent project/partnership?

LCE led the now well-known campaign to change the tax lien laws in the District because homeowners (especially older homeowners) were losing their homes and all the equity in them due to a tax lien system that was badly broken. A front page expose in the Washington Post and our hard work helped change all that by getting the D.C. law changed, providing protective measures which are most helpful to vulnerable people.

  1. What is the single greatest challenge that your organization faces (besides finances) and how are you dealing with this challenge?

The same one that Lucy in the comic strip Peanuts complained about: There is no greater burden than having great potential.

  1. What advice do you have for other people in your position?

Mentoring is a powerful tool and serving as a mentor or seeking out mentors to guide you is an amazingly effective way to problem-solve and learn skills that too often are learned only by trial and error.

  1. What’s next/coming up for you?

We are exploring the possibility of taking some of LCE’s projects beyond the confines of the District of Columbia. This would mean setting up discrete projects of LCE in conjunction with other legal service or bar associations in other states to expand the availability of free legal services to older people in these selected communities.